Maruzen’s Interdynamic KG9 Full Auto NonBlowBack

 

Maruzen’s
Interdynamic KG9 Full Auto NonBlowBack
by
Ash
Nicholls

Stock
Specifications
Model Maruzen’s
Interdynamic KG9 Full Auto NonBlowBack
FPS
88m/s
(0.97 J)
Length: ???mm
Weight: ???
grams

Ammo
capacity:

80 rounds

KG9 Full Auto
NonBlowBack

| KG9 Full Auto GasBlowBack


Firstly a big thanks
go out to Josh Horowitz of
WinKong.net
who kindly supplied the movie screen caps and stills for this review. You
can find links to buy Big
Trouble in Little China
here
(I highly recommend purchasing it). –Arnie

Introductions
Ok, so ‘KG-9 CQB Assault Carbine‘ is a bit of a gobful, but short
of  “glorified monstrosity” I couldn’t think of a better moniker.
Besides that’s what it is: not quite the machine pistol it started life
as, and not quite the Assault rifle it aspires to be. It’s also a NBB, external
feed gasgun.

That’s right, one of
the “airsoft throwbacks”. One of those “obsolete” weapons that the Tokyo
Marui-ites want you to forget about. Well knackers to that, because this
thing is every bit as good as, and in terms of build better than anything
TM produce today.

The model in this review
is my personal skirmisher which is equipped with an extended barrel and
a folding stock, and is now the only KG9 in my collection (having let the
KG-9 GBB go to a better home where it’s
not used for shooting cockroaches; be nice to her, Taeko)

Construction
The Maruzen KG-9 is faithfully modelled after the classic ‘80’s
pimp-gun that shares it’s name (1).
Solid doesn’t begin to describe it: the vented barrel shroud, bolt
cover, receiver, trigger, magazine and mag. catch on the base gun
are all metal. The grip and mag housing are very tough ABS plastic.

The internals
are all metal levers in a plastic housing. The whole thing is finished
beautifully with a set of sling mounts moulded into the coachwork
for good measure. The after market parts for this gun are superb (2).

The folding stock
has a heavy cast zinc base which bolts to the back of the receiver
and grip, and the stock itself is made of steel. The barrel extension
kit consists of a machined brass barrel and a spun aluminium shroud
with a guide bearing fitted at the muzzle end.

Operation
After the fashion of all BV guns, the KG-9 operates on a short-stroke blow-forward
principle. A follower picks up a bb, gas pressure forces the bb against
an o-ring forming a seal(3).
The whole barrel is pushed forward until the o-ring reaches a slightly broader
point in the barrel guide, allowing it to expand and the bb to progress
(rapidly) down the barrel. The barrel returns, picking up the next bb.

The KG-9 has a selective
fire trigger(4)
and therefore is incredibly simple to operate in both semi and full auto.
Also, due to a rather sweet valve system, this is actuated in line with
the trigger, so no nasty linkages to mess around with(5).

Magazines
are spring fed and hold 80 rounds. The gun has a slight recoil due to the
reciprocation of the barrel, which increases with the extension fitted,
although it remains almost insignificant in terms of affecting accuracy.

The beast will feed
off pretty well anything you choose to pump through it(6).
I personally use either regulated C02 or Compressed air fed from
a proprietory airsoft tank (Sherman M4) at a feed pressure of 8-9kg cm-2.
 

Performance
Right, this is where all the sage and wise AEG owners nod
their heads and mutter about hop-up. Un-hopped, the KG-9 custom shoots straight
for 35-40m, before dropping off (stock performance is probably about 25m).
Yes, that far. The gun was chronoed at 88ms-1 using 0.25g bbs,
at a feed pressure of 8kgcm-2. That’d be about 0.97 J. Oh lordy.

In
the field, the gun consistently outperformed all of the Marui SMGs and a
good proportion of the Marui longs. Accuracy is excellent, perhaps due to
the lack of hop. Admittedly, lugging a gas supply into the field isn’t everyone’s
idea of fun, but once you get used to the feel of the tank being there,
the only real disadvantage in skirmishing is the magazine capacity.

Hi-caps can be fabricated(7),
however, and frankly with two spare clips you have 240 rounds to play with.
In CQB, this should be more than adequate. I prefer this gun to my electric
rifle(8) already, and will
probably rely on it as a primary from now on. These things are not to be
underestimated.

One delightful chap
who described me as “the strange foreigner with the obsolete gun”
was so confident that he broke cover 25 yards in front of me thinking he’d
be ok. Naturally, the ‘9 was pointable and accurate enough to draw a line
up him, and then pop his mate who stuck his head up to look from 5m behind
him. Marvellous!

Conclusion

Cons:

  • External
    feed: clumsy.

  • Parts
    are relatively tricky to obtain

  • No
    hop-up

  • No
    hi-cap mags

  • Stock
    version makes you look like a pimp

Pros:

  • Solid
    construction (85% metal)]

  • Excellent
    accuracy (due in part to lack of hop, ironically)

  • Very
    pointable

  • Incredibly
    easy to maintain

  • Stock
    version makes you look like a pimp

Performance

4/5
No hop. No problem.

Value
for money

4/5
second hand Japan: lovely prices.

Upgrade
potential

3/5
basically limited to what I’ve already stuck on her

Build
quality

5/5
Luvverly metal everywhere.

Overall
Potential

4/5
powerful, accurate, reliable, compact, pointable. It’d be perfect
if it weren’t for that sodding great airtank…

Comment
on this review in the forums


Last modified:
Wednesday, May 9, 2001 9:37 AM copyright 2001 ArniesAirsoft
‘Big Trouble in Little China’ imagery is copyright John Carpenter.




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