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Marlowe

Gas Gun Reccommended Gas Thread

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It might help if someone defined the different kinds of gas. I'm pretty much alone and get my gas by mail order. For example I'm familiar with green gas and 134a, but what is yellow, red, R22 and abbey gas. These designations might make sense locally but not universally.

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:(

 

 

:huh:

 

 

:unsure:

 

I've been running my TM P226 on HFC134a - am I gonna kill it? :(

 

No - 134a is the weakest of the three commonly available gases (excluding C02). Green gas gives the most power but can damage TM pistols as you usually need a full metal gun with better seals to be able to use this. I've run a TM 1911 on Red (mid power) gas with no problems in the gun but it doesn't seem to like one of the cheaper ACM mags. 134a is the gas I was given with the gun and I've never had anym issues using it except the FPS was 230-240 with this and 250+ with Red ;)

 

Don't confuse Green with 134a though - they both come in green cans!

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Don't confuse Green with 134a though - they both come in green cans!

 

Why do they do that its really confusing as I accidentaly shot a tm 1911 plastic and I accidentaly put green gas instead of 134a and the slide came back so hard it borke they should make it another colour for saftey's sake. Just my thought.

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I have been using a stock TM P226 fr about 2-3 years now as my only side arm and feeding Abbey Ultra gas. Now even though Abbey Ultra is not quite as strong as green it is close and stronger than 134A.

 

I have never had any problems with it except a non-gas related BB feed issue with one of the mags.

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NBB:

Marushin - Derringer (8mm) - H134a ONLY

 

Revolver:

Tanaka - SAA (Casyopea) - H134a/Green

 

Lever-action Rifle:

Marushin - M1892 Maxi - H134a ONLY

 

Shotgun:

Marushin - M1887 Guards Gun - H134a/Green

 

 

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No - 134a is the weakest of the three commonly available gases (excluding C02). Green gas gives the most power but can damage TM pistols as you usually need a full metal gun with better seals to be able to use this. I've run a TM 1911 on Red (mid power) gas with no problems in the gun but it doesn't seem to like one of the cheaper ACM mags. 134a is the gas I was given with the gun and I've never had anym issues using it except the FPS was 230-240 with this and 250+ with Red ;)

 

Don't confuse Green with 134a though - they both come in green cans!

 

Wait a min... I thought Red gas was the super powerful one?

 

134a/duster then Ultra, then Green/Propane. Then Red?

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Wait a min... I thought Red gas was the super powerful one?

 

134a/duster then Ultra, then Green/Propane. Then Red?

Pretty much. As he is in the UK he has probably done the classic thing that i so regually see people do and assume that Abbey Predator Ultra is red gas because it comes in a red can, it is not.

 

In order of power from lowest to highest it goes...

 

  • HFC 134a (Sometimes known as green gas)
  • Abbey Predator Ultra (Not red gas)
  • ASG Ultrair (Green can, 90% propane and 10% butane mix, slightly lower power than Green gas iirc, maybe a bit higher than Predator Ultra? No silicone oil in this gas either)
  • Green Gas (CH2 FCF3 CH4 seems to be the standard mix, or propane with some other gases and silicone oil mixed in to you and me)
  • Propane (Generally higher power than Green Gas as a result of lower impurities)
  • Red Gas (HCFC R22, has a pressure of around 150psi compared to 120psi for propane)
  • Black Gas (Assumed to be Co2 due to the colour of canisters being black, around 800psi)

 

There is also Yellow Gas which from what i gather is more powerfull than Green Gas, i suspect that may be the same as Red Gas or just straight propane with some silicone oil, doesn't seem to be available outside a few EU countries.

 

Guarder also do a 'higher power' gas in black cans, don't confuse it with Co2 as it seems that is just straight propane as well with silicone oil if the reports about additional power over standard Green Gas are correct.

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Well L96 AWP - Red/Green/134a/pretty much anything

 

I had it running on freaking lighter gas until it broke my valve lol ....for reference btw it shoots 500fps on green and thats down to 320fps on standard swan butane :P ...that confused the marshall at combat south...

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Freon is HCFC22, if you are using an non airsofting labelled can then I would add some silicone to be cautious.

 

  • Green Gas (CH2 FCF3 CH4 seems to be the standard mix, or propane with some other gases and silicone oil mixed in to you and me)

 

Got to point out there that the formula for propane is C3H8, "CH2 FCF3" is HFC134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) and "CH2 FCF3 CH4" is a bogus label on some green gas trying to pass off as something other than propane.

 

Check the highlights;

greengasnot.jpg

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I'll assume that the safe approach for a TM Tactical Master (as I didn't see any TM M9 model in the list) is HFC134a.

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GBB:

 

KJW USP w/ metal slide: runs fine on green, although I have doubts how will metal slide behave on 134a.

Bell M1911: runs fine on green, both plastic and metal slide. Should work on 134a.

Bell M9: Use green.

HFC M190: as said earlier, use green.

Marushin shell-ejecting Glock 19: 134a only. Green gas has too high pressure and starts leaking immediately.

KWC Mini Uzi: CO2 by default. Can be fitted with a magazine conversion that allows use of green gas and cycles on it without problems.

 

Revolvers:

 

Tanaka SAA, latest version: 134a/green.

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