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Glock Picture Thread

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Somehow I missed this the first time around. This is a great looking piece. Did you do the modifications yourself? I'm especially curious about the installation of the Docter Sight.

 

Thank You :)

All mods are done by me and the reddot mounting was done with a file and some patience since my Dremel decided to die just as I started the work.

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561148_3238731301572_172305523_n.jpg

 

HK3P Glock with Detonator G17 slide. Since then it's had oodles of internal and external upgrades, namely an adjustable trigger and a Docter.

If only there was a way to sit the Docter closer to the slide

Edited by PreacherMan

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Nice that's one flavor I have on my to do list.

 

I've been usign my KSC G19 as a change of pace secondary from the Sig and a G17 build seems to be called for as a result.

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As for the Vickers mag bases, I simply just want them to allow me to drop my mags base plate down and to not break easily. The Vicker's mag bases are made with reinforced plastic from what I remember so I SUPPOSE it'll be better than the airsoft stuff. I've got the nineball rubber ones but they don't secure really well against the magazine body such that once you drop the mags the base will slide 1/2 way off all the time..same with inserting a mag forcefully into the gun :(

 

I finally got around to testing the Vickers mag bases. They are not compatible with any of the Glocks I had on hand (KSC/KWA/TM/WE/HK3P). Real Glocks are just a touch wider than the airsoft version. If you need better base pads, the KWA ATP (which uses the same mags as the KSC/KWA Glock) has a thick rubberized base pad that is designed to absorb a lot of the shock created when dropping the mag onto a hard surface. They're not going to 100% protect your mags, but they'll do a heck of a lot better than the OEM Glock style mag bases.

 

In other news, I installed 10-8 front (tritium) and rear sights and Vickers Enhanced Slide Release into my KSC/KWA Glock 17. Waiting on the Vickers mag release too.

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The older gen Glock baseplates for NFML mags fit my KSC and KJW mags perfectly, with just some filing to allow the follower to lock it in place.

The current gen Glock baseplates were also too wide for my mags, I had to use a soldering iron to reshape them to fit.

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I finally got around to testing the Vickers mag bases....

 

Hey uscmCorps, thanks for the reply! XD

 

In that case, I'll just stick with the airsoft stuff since I'm running a HK3P. Thanks again for the info dude :D

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No problem!

 

 

Took some quick pics with my phone last night after installing the 10-8 night sights and Vickers Slide Release on my KSC G17:

 

kscg1701sm.jpg

 

kscg1702sm.jpg

 

Waiting on the Vickers Mag Release to come in. Gonna install a Vickers Slide Release on one of my ATPs as well. Liking it all so far.

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Nice stippling uscmCorps! I wonder what makes that "melty" texture but it seems very "controllable", is it a special solder iron head and/or some technique?

 

Wanted to get another Glock ( may be just the frame ) and do some more stippling, and I want to do some SAI-ish texture this time.

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It's technique.

 

Ever time I stipple I spend time warming up on scrap plastic. I find the more I do the more I get in the groove.

 

That said there are some plastics that lend themselves better to this than others.

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Yup, it's not the most difficult thing to do. Anyone with a soldering iron and a little patience can stipple plastic with ease. Doing it well takes practice. And as Danke points out, different plastics react slightly differently to that kind of heat. Even different Glock frames by different companies can give you different results. I've stippled every major brand of airsoft Glock. The easiest plastic to work with was the TM plastic. Some plastics melt without issue while others require more heat or just get stringy no matter what you do. Also, the same plastics by the same company can also react differently if they're dyed a different color (like black vs. FDE) as dyes can change how the plastic behaves.

 

A really good tutorial on stippling can be found on AR15.com:

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_6_19/261758_Heat_Stippling_Polymer__A_Tutorial_.html

 

The technique outlined at the beginning of the thread is what gave me a lot of tips when I started doing pistol frames.

 

Truth is, for me stippling is the easy part. The most time consuming part of my process is prepping the frame prior to the stippling. For my Glock frames I like to remove the finger grooves, round the trigger guard, re-contour the frame in general for grip reduction and a higher tang grip and also make it feel less boxy in the process, make certain areas butter smooth that if left untreated might create calluses on a high round count sidearm. Then you have to mask off the areas you intend to stipple to get nice sharp areas. Other hurdles that may occur is when air bubbles in the plastic are encountered. I often encounter these in the trigger guard area. Sizable bubbles that need to be filled with polymer and then reshaped. Time-wise, the stippling itself only consumes about 25% of the entire process.

 

You also want to be mindful of the texture you create. Is it too aggressive or too soft? Is it comfortable? Do you even want it to be comfortable? When holstered will the texture chew up your clothing?

 

My recommendation is to grab some unneeded plastic parts, like rail panels and such, stuff you never plan to use and don't care about and practice your technique on that.

 

Regarding the Glock pics I just posted, that Glock was in fact the very first polymer handgun frame I ever did. It works, but it isn't the cleanest job I've done so far. I've stippled about a dozen more frames since then and refined my technique a lot more. For example:

http://img109.imageshack.us/img109/142/g1701leftsm.jpg

http://img137.imageshack.us/img137/3297/g1702rightsm.jpg

http://img543.imageshack.us/img543/585/g1703sm.jpg

http://img13.imageshack.us/img13/7493/g1704sm.jpg

http://img843.imageshack.us/img843/2964/g1705sm.jpg

 

I've often considered selling my services to do this, but I don't think people would be willing to pay what I'd ask. Glad you like it though!

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Thanks for the info :)

 

Still love using mine :P but wanna add some texture on the trigger guard area for now.

 

 

...... and I still have one Marui G17 frame to play with, wish to try grip reduction by filling epoxy in the palm area cavity and Dremel it like crazy to have a straight back strap, and then stipple the frame with some new texture... I would be very happy if I can do some texture like 3M Safety Walk tape ( Clicky ) :P

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I really like the stipple job and grip reduction you did on yours. Regarding an extreme grip reduction like what you're talking about, I'm not crazy about how straight back straps feels on Glocks myself. Just not for me and how I shoot I guess. As for adding texture to the trigger guard area on your gun I can see how doing the same texture technique that you have on the rest of the gun might not be ideal. In that area on the underside of the trigger guard you want more grip, but not too much grip. You also need to be careful of how much and how deep you stipple it since the material thickness there is so thin. I would get a fine point soldering tip and slowly do the area with that.

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Aha, I see your point there, I may treat the spare frame as a testing platform for the epoxy-filling, as well as different stippling technique........ instead of just stamping Noveske-ish shapes on the surface, then apply the new technique to my current trigger guard.

 

 

P.S. just re-visited the link to AR15 forum above.......the idea of attaching a modified screw to the iron is very useful for my need, the smaller shaped pattern oh the screw head seems tend to produce a carpet-like texture, time to collect some unused rail covers :D

Edited by Katotaka

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I use the same screw head stippling method. I find it covers a lot more surface area in less time and effort and yet still gets you a random texture. All you have to do is find a flat head screw with the same threading as the soldering iron you have. Cut a cross hatch pattern into it with a dremel or file and then stipply everything plastic in sight.

 

To texture something with an apparently random looking pattern, what I do is randomly start stippling everywhere first. I don't cluster. When you start clustering from the get-go you can end up with a pattern. After a while you can start filling in the spaces. When dealing with edges, I stipple to the edge of where I wanted to stipple, then go back over it to randomize the line. Remember, stippling doesn't remove material, it displaces it. So you're basically just moving it around.

Here's a rail panel I did with an aggressive stipple job. Works incredibly well in the rain.

stipplingprogressionsma.jpg

 

Also, take the time to either use a sharpie to outline the edges of where you want the stippling to stay within. I like masking tape as I can get straighter lines using tape.

 

You did a fantastic job of reshaping the frame. Just do the same thing but practice the new stipple technique you want to try on some scrap plastic before you do it on the frame. Also, and you probably knew this based on the way you stippled your last glock, make sure you don't stipple all the way down to the bottom edge of the mag well as the geometry gets really thin down there and can warp. If you do wish to stipple that far down, make sure you have a back behind it to keep the material flat.

  • Like 1

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Sweet, very useful info!

 

I did have a moment wanting to mod the magwell area like this when I do the homework before getting my hands on the dremel, then I realized the problem and told myself: Darn it, I'm lazy, keep the Shooter's Design magwell and I'm good to go. :P

 

This time I'm doing it on a spare frame and I have my current gun up and running, I can take my time and try anything I want.

 

 

Oh by the way, saw this while derping around some Japanese websites, extremely clean work and I love the SAI-esque texture, looks like stippled with a "meat hammer" shaped head.

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Since we are talking too much ( never! LOL ) about stippling glocks and not posting actual glock pictures.

Here's a pic of my glock, again, with some Blue BBs for simmunitions-esque projectiles.

 

gallery_21681_2029_44844.jpg

 

In fact non-white BBs is much less visible and even invisible indoors, and is helping me to improve confidence and skill, by preventing me looking at the flying BB until it hit the target, which I think is a bad habit and wastes precious time.

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That's exactly what I recommend to people who shoot real steel a lot, and for that exact reason. Actually, I recommend black BBs. I didn't know those blue BBs were not detectable by eye mid-flight. What brand are they?

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Yeah black BBS are not for everyone and all situations. They're great for 10 yards and in marksmanship supplemental training. And good for force on force training. But their viability in skirmishes is highly debatable. I know a lot of the instructors who use Airsoft as part of the training instruction prefer black BBs.

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Too late to edit my last post. Picture thread needs moar pics:

 

kscg1703sm.jpg

 

KSC G17 with RS 10-8 sights (fronts are Tritium). I installed the Vickers extended mag release last night. It was a perfect drop in.

Edited by uscmCorps

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Those BBs are G&G 0.28g, I started using black ones for both skirmish and action shooting since last year and it feels great.

 

 

The indoor field I shot last night has kinda weak lighting and blue BBs are already invisible, I choose blue BBs because they are new to local shops and I can make fun for claiming myself using "training" ammunitions :P, and I still use black for rifles.

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There isn't a thread for ATP's ... which are essentially KSC Glocks dressed up differently. So I made sure I at least had a KSC Glock in the pic too :):

 

atpu.jpg

 

I'm really digging the ATP. Looks and feels a lot like my M&P 9mm. Fits in both my G17 and M&P holsters. And the internal parts are compatible with a KWA/KSC G17. Last night I installed a Vickers Enhanced Slide Stop on the ATP which I think looks better than the OEM one and is less easy to accidentally trip. More about the ATP here.

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Nicest ATP I've seen yet, covering those trades up has made all the difference. Hope those 10-8s were an easy fit, literally just watched the gun selection/setup section of Adaptive Handgun in work this morning and it really got me thinking about the usefulness of those stepped rear sights.

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