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hwagan

The G&P M733 AEG

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Introduction and History

The real steel M733, from my limited knowledge, is a variant of the M16A2. It's a carbine version, with a sliding stock, shortened foregrip and an 11.5" barrel. It fires 5.56 flavour ammunition, it was in Black Hawk Down, and it's mainly used for shooting at things. That's about where my real steel knowledge ends.

 

This review is focusing on the G&P replica of aforementioned weapon. G&P are known for making full metal, pre-upgraded AEG's, almost exclusively of the AR15 series of weapons. From what i know, G&P are similar to classic army in that they started to produce parts for AEG's, and then began to produce complete guns. They've got a fairly good reputation among airsofters, and they're one of the better known and fairly trusted brands out there. The out the box stats for this rifle are as follows:

 

Plastic parts - Foregrip, Stock, Pistol grip

Metal parts - Everything else

Barrel length - 300mm

Hopup - Adjustable

Feet per second with a .2 - 280-320 (it varies from gun to gun obviously - mine came out at 310fps)

Magazine supplied - 120 round midcap

Price - £249.99 at Airsoft Armoury - As usual, amazing and friendly customer service is included in the price.

 

First impressions and Packaging

Well, the G&P packaging department are a lazy bunch. And when i say lazy, i mean they don't do anything at all, really. Ya know how most of the time you buy a shiney new AEG, it comes in a shiney box covered in pictures? This one doesn't. Ya know how an AEG usually comes with a manual, a pack of BB's, a catalogue, a cleaning rod and maybe a small tool or two? Nope. Nothing. Ya know how even the most basic AEG comes with a styrofoam cutout within the box to hold it in place? You'll be lucky. The rifle is packaged in a plain, unmarked cardboard box. Within this cardboard box, is a huge amount of bubble wrap, an AEG, and a magazine, sandwiched between 2 half inch sheets of foam. That's it. Nothing else. In all fairness, the packaging is perfectly adequate to protect the gun in transit, but it's not very impressive. Saying that, the box is bound to end up rotting under a bed, unless you're too much of a cheapskate to buy a gun case. I haven't taken a picture of the packaging, because everyone knows what a cardboard box looks like. Picking up the gun is the fun part here - It's got a good heft to it, around 2 and a half kilos, it looks absolutely fantastic, and it feels very very very solid.

 

Here's some pictures. We all like pictures.

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Externals

I'll start from the front here. The A2 style birdcage flashhider is very nicely machined, and is black in colour. I have no idea what kind of metal it's made from, but it's rock solid, and doesn't scratch easily. One minor annoyance is the 14mm Positive thread. Almost all AEG and parts manufacturers use a negative 14mm thread, and this means certain silencers and flash-hiders won't fit. Not a huge problem, but a bit of a nuisance.

The outer barrel is very nice indeed - Again, i don't have a magnet to test the kind of metal it's made of, but if i wasn't scared of the airsofting world correcting me, i'd say it's blued steel. Wether it is or not, it certainly looks like it. The paintwork is completely smooth and flat, and it has a very slight blue tinge to it. The outer barrel is also entirely wobble free. It doesn't move a millimetre, even if you want it too. I don't advise it, but i'm perfectly comfortable holding the weapon by the flashhider at arm's length... It really is solid.

 

Picture:

 

Image210.jpg

 

Onto the foregrips - They're a little more 'glossy' than some of the later model armalites i've seen, and i have a feeling this is deliberate. Again, this is merely my opinion, but i have a feeling G&P have tried to reproduce the fact composite materials weren't as advanced as they are nowadays, and as such the foregrip doesn't have a matte finish. Still, it's very well made, the 2 halves fit together perfectly, and there's almost zero rotational play in them. They're not exactly shiney either, just not quite matte. With the battery fitted, you'll have to deliberately try and wobble them to make them move. I'll take this opportunity to let you all know that a standard mini battery will not fit. The foregrips on this weapon are significantly thinner than the M4A1, and as such, a split type battery is required. Fitting it is a bit of a pain, but once it's in the whole foregrip feels even more solid. The delta ring is also fairly easy to pull back, but stiff enough to keep the thing from wobbling. The delta ring is also in the same blued steel finish as the outer barrel, and looks very nice. There's a mock gas tube running the length of the foregrip under the top half, which protrudes out the back and into the receiver - a nice detail. The handguards unfortunately lack a heat-shield, although for all i know this might be to do with the weapon being an earlier design.

 

Now onto the receiver. Bit of a weird one, this. The lower receiver has Colt M16A2 markings, and the upper receiver has the shell deflector and forward assist of an A2. However, the carry handle and sights are of the A1 style. I don't know if this is accurate to the real steel or not, and it's a very minor difference. See the below picture:

 

Image207.jpg

 

Personally, i think it's fantastic, because i hate the A2 style sights - they wobble like a fat bird doing the robot. Anyway, the receiver itself is beautifully finished. The paintwork is a totally smooth, flawless matte black. It looks exactly like it should, and you can really tell this is no cheapsoft. The magazine fits with a nice, positive click. The selector switch has a good tactile feel, and you know when it's in the desired position... there's no audible click, but that's one more thing to give you away right? The bolt stop is unfortunately not functional in this replica, nor any other G&P AEG to my knowledge. Frankly, i couldn't care less, but some of you realism fans may be a little upset. The dust cover is also not flipped open by the charging handle - Slightly dissapointing, as it doesn't make all the fun clicky and clacky noises we all love. However, it's no detriment to the weapon at all, and helps me out hugely because i always forget to close the damn dust cover. This is also where the hop-up adjustment is done, in the standard M4A1 fashion. The hopup seems very good so far after 1000 rounds, and hasn't moved at all. The pistol grip is of the earlier A1 style, and lacks the middle finger resty bit - Hooray, no more blisters! The trademarks on the receiver are the nicest part of a very very nice receiver - They're very deeply engraved, crystal clear, very cool looking, and from what i know, authentic. The colt logo looks perfect, as does the various text. The trades are engraved a good half a millimetre, and aren't going to wear off.. No unique serial number though, but ah well.

 

Here's a picture.

Image206.jpg

 

The stock, like many parts of the weapon, is old school. None of that funny shaped LE stuff here - Just the standard early carbine sliding stock. Same kind of plastic as the handguards, which looks very nice. The stock is adjustable for length of pull, but only to 3 different positions. In, halfway, and out. Nice and simple. It clicks into place very firmly, and has very little play. Compared to various other brands of M4 AEG i've handled, it's one of the most solid feeling stocks i've used. Stays in place just fine, the chequering on the shoulder pad keeps it where it's supposed to be, and the buffer tube is the same nice finish as the receiver.

 

So, externally - It's beautiful. Amazingly well finished, lots of lovely little details, and i personally love the A1 sights on an A2 receiver. Short of spending ridiculous amounts of money, you're not going to get a better looking replica of an M733. Suck on that, Tokyo Marui.

 

Internals, Accuracy and Shootyness

Right, onto firing the thing. Fitting the battery is a standard M4 style affair - Pull back the delta ring, remove the lower half of the handguard, connect the wires, place the battery in the lower half, and slide the front end into the collar and the back end up to meet the top half, and let the delta ring slip back over the rear collar. As i've mentioned, you won't fit an 8.4 volt mini battery in here - I've tried an 1100NimH, as well as a 1200 and 1400. None of them fit, due to the thinner foregrips. The battery is a little bit awkward and fiddly to fit, but a woman's bra is a little fiddly to remove - doesn't stop you trying to pull though does it? It's a minor nuisance at worst, and no reason to complain really. It's better than a god-damned battery bag. A 1600mah NimH battery fits, with the aid of a little swearing. Loading up the included 120 round midcap magazine is the usual affair - you'll want a speedloader really. G&P clearly expect you to thumb them in individually, but thankfully i already own a speedloader. The magazine is nicely finished in black, however it'll require a bit of silicone oil out the box to feed smoothly. The magazine wobble is to be expected, but it's a lot less noticeable than on some other brands of AEG, and there really isn't very much of it. The following magazines work and feed flawlessly in the M733;

 

G&P Midcaps

Classic Army Midcaps

Classic Army Hicaps

MAG plastic Midcaps

King Arms plastic Midcaps

 

So, shooting the thing then. Loading up the magazine, inserting it and switching the safety to 'semi' is a good way to start - The gearbox feels EXTREMELY smooth. I mean really, i found it quite remarkable. I've fired many, many AEG's, and this one has about 20% of the motor whine of your standard marui job. You feel every movement in the gearbox through the pistol grip, and it all feels very slick. The motor also makes an audible/tactile 'kerchack' noise at the end of the cycle. I'm not sure if this is some sort of electrics system fitted somewhere, but it's almost as if the motor is resetting itself for the next shot - No idea if there's a mosfet or something hidden within - i don't think there is, but it's very nice nonetheless. I've also noticed the FPS readings are very consistent, with 20 shots varying only by + or - 6 feet per second. You'll have to ask someone who knows more about gearboxes than me to find out if there's something special in it. Either way, my old G&P M4 managed 125,000 rounds before anything went wrong, and the M733 houses the very same model of gearbox. Going on my own experience, G&P are good at the old gearbox malarkey.

 

Feet per second wise, mine came in at an average of 310 feet per second with a 0.2 gram BB over 20 shots. The lowest result recorded of the 20 was 308, and the highest was 314. Of those 20 shots, 16 of them were between 309 and 311 - That's pretty damn consistent, which is good for accuracy and things. Speaking of accuracy...

 

Out of the box, it's perfectly adequate. A man sized target at 50 yards is possible with a few shots, and a single shot in good weather will hit a man almost every time at 30 yards. It's what you'd expect from a stock AEG with a 300mm barrel really, perhaps a little better down to the consistent muzzle velocity. The standard barrel stayed in the rifle for all of 100 shots before i took the thing out and replaced it with a Madbull black python 6.03mm barrel - I can't speak highly enough of these things. I've got one in every AEG i own, and i will never believe anything bad about them. Here's an idea of the increase in accuracy.

 

Standard sheet of A4 paper - Each circle is approximately an inch wide. Firing 10 shots on semi automatic from a seated position, using a couple of pillows as a rest, at 14 metres in good weather - Here are the results.

 

Image215.jpg

 

The top grouping is with the standard bore barrel, hop set properly and sights dialled in - Around 2.5-3", pretty good for an AEG. The bottom grouping is with the Madbull barrel fitted - the difference speaks for itself. The grouping with the madbull barrel is around 1.5" - That's almost twice as accurate as before. I don't understand the physics, but clearly the black python barrel is a worthwhile investment. On top of the accuracy improvement, the M733 is now chrono'ing at 322-327 feet per second, which is bang on the limits of most UK sites.

 

Oooh, i forgot the Rate of Fire - This thing empties BB's like i empty last night's KFC. Honestly, the rate of fire is insane. With an 8.4 volt 1600 MaH battery, the chrono tells me this thing is spitting out ONE THOUSAND, ONE HUNDRED AND NINTEY FOUR ROUNDS PER MINUTE. Let that sink in for a minute - That's about 20 BB's leaving the barrel and heading for the bad guy every single second. Fair enough, RoF's like this can be achieved with expensive gear sets and motors and the like, but for an out of the box AEG, i haven't seen much better than this. CA M15's come quite close with a decent battery, as do a couple of Marui's models, but generally upgrades are required for such a high RoF. The thing sounds terrifying, and i'd hate to be on the other end of it behind some corrugated steel. I'm certain i'd run away and hide somewhere if i was ever in such a situation.

 

Summary

I've fallen madly in love with this rifle. It's a wonderfully pointable, compact little carbine. It looks absolutely stunning straight out of the box, and it makes a nice change from all my RIS'd up tacticool stuff. Putting rails on this thing would be a crime. The mix of A1 and A2 features are brilliant, especially with the use of A1 sights and pistol grip - both much better than the A2 versions in my opinion. The build quality is without a flaw, and being G&P, it's going to be reliable as hell. It's heavy enough to feel real, but light enough to sprint around like a looney. It shoots brilliantly out of the box, and needs nothing more than a tightbore barrel to give you a serious contender for any event. The length is perfect for CQB, yet the range is easily good enough for outdoor combat - It matches a brand new CA M15A2 rifle purchased on the same day, despite the M15A2 having a madbull barrel fitted as well. The rate of fire is astonishing - Other than a couple of very, VERY minor niggles, this is a nigh-on perfect out the box AEG. The lack of a unique serial and the manually opened bolt cover and fiddly battery fitting are the only downfalls i can see of this rifle, and they're all such minor issues they're barely worth mentioning.

 

If you're looking for something to replicate black hawk down, or you just want something a little different from an M4, this is your answer. It's exceptionally good value for money, and you should buy one. If you want an M733 AEG, i can't see how you can do better than this frankly.

 

And finally, here are some more pictures - I've fitted a VFC M4QD style silencer, which fits on the standard flashhider and looks awesome... I'm not planning on any other external modifications, because this is without a doubt the best looking rifle i own as is.

 

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Very nice! Every since I was a kid, I liked the look of the Colt Carbine. I realize this is an Airsoft forum, but here's a few pics of a genuine Colt 700 carbine - Moderators, feel free to delete. You'll notice there are some subtle differences when you compare it against the AEG.

 

Colt 700 hand guards on the right and Colt 6920 (let's just call it a semi automatic M4) on the left. You'll notice that the old hand guards only had a single heat shield held without any glue. Also, the new 6920 has a much more dull finish while the old ones are much shinier. The biggest difference is that they only had 6 vent holes. It looks like the G&P did a good job replicating it.

M700handguards.jpg

 

Ejection port side. This is where you start to see some differences - G&P does not have the correct lower receiver and hand guard ring. The Colt 700's didn't use the flat ring to hold the handguards - notice they used an angular one. Also note that the lower receiver is basically an M16A2 and has the round edge by the front pivot pin along with smooth edges around the rear take down pin. The grip should be an M16A2 type. G&P is using an M16 design with the sharp corners. Typically you'll see some forge markings around the carry handle, below the sight. The one in the photo has "CH" forge markings which were fairly common - from my limited understanding of forge marks, this doesn't necessarily mean it's a genuine Colt.

M700ejectionportside.jpg

 

Selector side. Pretty accurate markings on the AEG.

M700selectorside.jpg

 

Notice the slight variation in the castle nut. The one on top is the new Colt 6920. There are large notches on the rear, while the 700 had only the small notches on the front for staking. In the photo, I loosed the nut a bit to show the hole for the wrench. Note that this is gone in the new Colt carbines. From your photos, I can't tell if G&P replicated this accurately.

M700castlenut.jpg

 

The buffer tube. Colt 700's used a two position while the 6920 has 6.

M700buffertube.jpg

 

This is the Colt 700 carbine stock. G&P replicated the 600 and is not correct for a 733. Might be a bit tough to see, but Colt 700 stocks are marked with an "1 N" right above the lever.

M700stock.jpg

 

Overall I think G&P did a good job - you most definitely get a sense it's a retro carbine. The only problem is the M16 lower receiver with M16A2 engravings; a bit odd. I hope this help.

 

Thanks.

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You've just single handedly answered every single question about the various little quirks on the gun - Brilliant input, thanks very much fella. I'm not too sure about the buffer tube ring, i'll have to check that tonight. Still, barring a few pretty small differences, i'm quite impressed that G&P have gone to the effort of replicating the glossier finish on the handguards and have got the markings right... Overall i'm insanely pleased with it, the rate of fire sounds like someone tearing canvas.

 

Still, i'm entirely certain it's nowhere near as fun to shoot as yours - very nice pair indeed.

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Ive had a TM one of these for years and its easily my favorite AEG Ive ever owned and probably the best shooting aswell. Really tempting to upgrade to one of these though for that full metal feeling.

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Ive had a TM one of these for years and its easily my favorite AEG Ive ever owned and probably the best shooting aswell. Really tempting to upgrade to one of these though for that full metal feeling.

 

 

I used to own a TM one some time back, and it is a very nice gun indeed, but if you're after an even nicer one - I can honestly say it's well worth the investment. This thing has instantly topped my favourite AEG pile.. As Bababooey kindly showed, some of the details are a little more accurate, and it really is as solid/reliable/shootable as you could want an M733 to be - I'd really recommend it if you're looking for a metal version, especially as this one isn't much heavier than the TM but still has the lovely metal feel to it. On top of that, in my experience G&P have been just as reliable as TM as long as you don't mess with the gearbox, and putting a TN barrel will get it right around the UK limit.

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It was £249.99 from Airsoft Armoury - I haven't actually been able to find any other retailers that have it in the UK, it isn't even on WGC or Redwolf... I think AA had 4 or 5 left in stock when i went, might not be a bad idea to see if you can have one reserved though.

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Ejection port side. This is where you start to see some differences - G&P does not have the correct lower receiver and hand guard ring. The Colt 700's didn't use the flat ring to hold the handguards - notice they used an angular one. Also note that the lower receiver is basically an M16A2 and has the round edge by the front pivot pin along with smooth edges around the rear take down pin. The grip should be an M16A2 type. G&P is using an M16 design with the sharp corners.

 

Wrong I'm afraid, early M733's did use flat slip rings and M16A1 receivers. G&P were trying to replicate the early model. And it wasn't just a fluke, evidenced by the introduction of an 'early' and 'late' model M733 front end in the G&P range.

 

 

This is the Colt 700 carbine stock. G&P replicated the 600 and is not correct for a 733. Might be a bit tough to see, but Colt 700 stocks are marked with an "1 N" right above the lever.

 

Wrong again, most early models used the Gen 2 stock.

 

 

Overall I think G&P did a good job - you most definitely get a sense it's a retro carbine. The only problem is the M16 lower receiver with M16A2 engravings; a bit odd. I hope this help.

 

Yes, tis odd, oh well.

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Wrong I'm afraid, early M733's did use flat slip rings and M16A1 receivers. G&P were trying to replicate the early model. And it wasn't just a fluke, evidenced by the introduction of an 'early' and 'late' model M733 front end in the G&P range.

 

Wrong again, most early models used the Gen 2 stock.

 

That's very interesting. What are you basing this on? I only own one Colt US Government 700 series carbine and it shipped with the angled slip rings with the "1 N" plastic stock. I do not own a 600 carbine (I do have a re-built Colt US Government GX5857 and has standard slip ring, but that's another story all together) - however, I do have Colt documentation (various advertisements, manuals, and such) from the 80's showing them shipped without standard slip rings (they are all angled).

 

Regarding the stocks, I do understand that genuine Colt aluminum carbine stocks (what you refer to as "Gen 2") were manufactured through the mid 1980's. So I don't doubt that they were used. Again, the one I own has a plastic "1 N" stock.

 

I should have been clear that am basing my first post on a Colt US Government 700 that I own. Of course it would be foolish to conclude all are identical to mine. Indeed there are several variations of 600 and 700 carbines, espcially once they are in the hands of the military - I believe it was common for the US Airforce to perform a number of modifications, mixing older parts with new.

 

I have no personal knowledge of an "early" or "late" model Colt 733 so I would be very interested in more information. Thanks!

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Great review! ;)

 

I've owned one of these in my time as well; solid shooter and despite it's "full metal-ness" it was still pretty light.

 

The only difficulties I had with one of these is trying to find a battery that would fit the hand-guards. (I was using RS Rock River ones)

 

I might treat myself on payday then. Where did you get it and how much was it if you don't mind me asking?

 

There's actually one for sale on the forums right now. I believe the package comes with the gun, battery, and real steel handguards.

Last time I checked, the seller was asking around $200 for it.

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He's in the U.K., though.

 

I have been wondering about the G&P's myself... Any chance of a reliability review a couple of skirmishes down the line?

 

Ben.

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Regardless of what receiver was used, i doubt the real ones had a m16a1 lower with m16a2 stamped on it....

 

Also didnt realize it was legit for these to have bayo lugs

 

The only thing about G&P reliability is if you run them hard you will have to replace the gears and they may be some fiddly work to do in the inside like reshimming/lubing, cleaning up the flash on the hop up wheel, buying new bucking and nub, and making sure there is no weight in the piston.

 

Also sometimes they ship the carbines with a type 0 cylinder...weird

 

Still fighting internally between a m733 or a xm lol

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That's very interesting. What are you basing this on? I only own one Colt US Government 700 series carbine and it shipped with the angled slip rings with the "1 N" plastic stock. I do not own a 600 carbine (I do have a re-built Colt US Government GX5857 and has standard slip ring, but that's another story all together) - however, I do have Colt documentation (various advertisements, manuals, and such) from the 80's showing them shipped without standard slip rings (they are all angled).

 

Regarding the stocks, I do understand that genuine Colt aluminum carbine stocks (what you refer to as "Gen 2") were manufactured through the mid 1980's. So I don't doubt that they were used. Again, the one I own has a plastic "1 N" stock.

 

I should have been clear that am basing my first post on a Colt US Government 700 that I own. Of course it would be foolish to conclude all are identical to mine. Indeed there are several variations of 600 and 700 carbines, espcially once they are in the hands of the military - I believe it was common for the US Airforce to perform a number of modifications, mixing older parts with new.

 

I have no personal knowledge of an "early" or "late" model Colt 733 so I would be very interested in more information. Thanks!

 

you guys are both correct and incorrect at the same time. It's hard to say it was exactly this or was exactly that for one reason, the firearm was given the XM designation. Even those with designations (i.e. XM733E1) were experimental firearms as the military was trying to adopt the first new carbine model since WWII, so there were likely very many variations from gun to gun to test fixes to issues reported in the field. Also having the XM designation means there were no battlefield statistics or other data taken on these weapons, so proving how a certain model is equipped also hard to do this way. You could go off of period photos or off the ones still found in use on air force bases but again the way the XM are they would likely be different from here to there as time past, but they ones on air bases should be the most consistant as they were off of one order and were likely not modified because well... it's the Air Force but that would not even apply here since it would seem this was to replicate ones used in the Somalia Conflict. There would have been no true standardization on the models that were fielded until they were officially adopted and designated M4 (with burst fire) and M4A1 (full auto).

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No, we are both correct, not both incorrect.

 

I wasn't saying that Bababooey was wrong period, I was just saying that he was wrong to compare it to a late model since G&P were replicating the early model, with pencil barrel etc.

 

 

KW

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He's in the U.K., though.

 

I have been wondering about the G&P's myself... Any chance of a reliability review a couple of skirmishes down the line?

 

Ben.

 

I'm taking it to a game this very sunday, so i'll be updating this review with how it's performing in actual warfake... However, i used to own a G&P M4, got rid of it a few months ago... That was after i'd owned it for 5 years, and despite various modifications to the front and rear end of it, the only failure i ever had was the motor gear, and the one it meshes with (sorry, not sure of the name) stripped. Had those replaced by Z1 2 years into owning it, and roughly 125,000 rounds - They were replaced with systema gears and bushings added, and it's still working in the hands of the new owner after another 100,000 rounds on the new gears. Regularly cleaning FTW is what i'd say, but in my experience G&P are very good and will handle a lot of abuse if you don't mess about with the box til you need to.

 

As for the RS discussion, thanks all for the input - I've learned more about my new favourite gun, and because of the variations it's easier to believe this replica is accurate :)

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As for the RS discussion, thanks all for the input - I've learned more about my new favourite gun, and because of the variations it's easier to believe this replica is accurate :)

 

Well said, although I think we can all agree that A2 markings on an A1 receiver is exceptionally odd and entirely wrong on the part of G&P.

 

 

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Well said, although I think we can all agree that A2 markings on an A1 receiver is exceptionally odd and entirely wrong on the part of G&P.

 

Well, according to wiki and other sources :

 

"Though Colt has focused its attention on carbines with 14.5-inch barrels and rifles with 20-inch barrels, Colt continues to make carbines with 11.5-inch barrels, which it calls Commandos. Commandos are assembled from whatever spare parts are available, so Model 733 Commandos can have A1-style upper receivers, A1-style upper receivers with case deflectors, or A2-style upper receivers, and M16A1-profile 1:7 or M16A2-profile 1:7 barrels."

 

From what I understand, these carbines were completed from available parts. So it's not unusual to see A1 upper with A2 lower...

 

 

 

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From what I understand, these carbines were completed from available parts. So it's not unusual to see A1 upper with A2 lower...

 

Hello. We're saying it's unusual to see A2 lower receiver markings engraved on an A1 lower receiver.

 

Also, I still have no evidence of an "early" vs "late" model M733 (any info would be great). I do not have an exact date on when mine was manufactured, but I was told based on the serial it appears to be around the late 80's, acquired in the early 90's. The internals are not are original Colt so it makes it more difficult to tell.

 

Regardless, the G&P version is good replica (except for the weird markings, but then again it's just markings).

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The Skirmish Report

 

Right, just got back from a day at Tech Brigade - Certainly not the most fun sunday i've had, but that's a different story for a different forum. You fine people probably want to know how the seemingly wonderful M733 performs in actual fake battle.

 

Well, frankly, it performs wonderfully. I can't really be *froitcagio* to do a proper paragraph stylee in depth run down here, as i'm feeling quite run down myself. So, here's some bullet points.

 

- The gun handles like an absolute dream. In most cases, i wouldn't be found dead without a vertical foregrip on my weapon. I find when using an M4A1 the handguards don't allow you to 'grab' the front end, rather just support it. Using the M733 made me almost forget what a VFG was - the thinner guards really allow you to grab the rifle and lock it into your shoulder. The length also makes legging it around very, very dense woodland easy, and so does the light weight. With an added guarder recoil pad, it practically jumps into your shoulder before you've even thought about lining up the sights.

 

- The gearbox in this thing, after 7,000 odd rounds now, is still perfect. It still feels as smooth as it did on day one, and it's taken some awful abuse today. 600 rounds in around 2 minutes - This was basically draining a 120 round magazine, reloading and repeating while covering an advance. Before now i've seen many guns fail after periods of extended full auto, unlike this one. Not only did it keep everyone's head down, the gearbox took the abuse with a smile.

 

- Solid as a frikkin' rock, still. All the bodywork is still brand new, despite bumps into trees there are no scratches, and nothing has become loose.

 

- The accuracy and range has been phenomenal - The hop is still set from the day i purchased the gun, and not a single double feed or flier to be seen. At the maximum useable range of around 60 yards, BB's are still in a fairly tight cluster. This is partly down to the new barrel, but the G&P hop unit has kept it's setting, and the G&P rubbers have performed exactly as they should.

 

- Battery life is pretty good. Using the 1600MaH 8.4 volt NiMh purchased with the gun, i was able to get through approximately 2,000 rounds before it needed changing - Unfortunately for me i needed to change batteries in the middle of a fire-fight, but i was able to complete the task in less than 2 minutes with the aid of some swearing. Not the easiest, but there are far worse designs.

 

- It's quite an eye-catching gun, simply down to the simple looks. People are so used to seeing RIS'd up 416's and CASV's and everything, that the M733 actually stands out. Plenty of people were commenting on the solidity, the looks and finish, and the pointability of the rifle.

 

- Combined with the VFC KAC suppressor, it's a very stealthy rifle - I was able to fire on a couple of guys in a bunker from 30 yards, and hit them both with a few shots on semi automatic before they'd figured out the direction shots were coming from. The gearbox runs smoothly and relatively quietly, but the silencer really helps take the 'CLACK' out of the sound.

 

 

Overall, this gun has firmly replaced my CA Scar as my new favourite weapon - The range and accuracy is flawless for a 330fps AEG once the tightbore barrel has been added, the weight/balance/length make the gun exceptionally easy to handle in tight spaces, it's solid as a rock and has taken a lot of abuse in one day all in it's stride.

 

Buy one - Buy one now.

 

 

A Couple of minor sidenotes...

I've added a Guarder recoil pad to mine - Weighing in at around 300 grammes, it balances the rifle really nicely, looks cool, and eliminates any slip on the shoulder. For only £17, it's a great addition to the rifle.

 

Purchased a Guarder dual sight adjustment tool for the foresight - It fits, but it's about 1/10th of a MM too wide to fit between the foresight blades, and had to be tapped on with the end of my K-bar to adjust the sights, and turned with a pair of pliers. No big deal, but something to bear in mind.

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I guess, a must have in every collection! awesome review!

 

 

Thanks buddy :) But yep, it's definitely a hell of an AEG.

 

Took it to another game today - 4000 rounds through it, didn't skip a beat. Survived heavy rain, and it still looks brand new. Not to mention one guy in a corrguated bunker on the other end described hearing the RoF dinging off the metal as 'Trouser changingly terrifying'.

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