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amateurstuntman

Schnitzel with noodles - what made you smile today?

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I am now the Acting Detachment Commander for the next six months, as my DC is on a temporary leave of absence. The OC told me that if the Det is running well at that time, that he will leave me in charge and move him elsewhere.

So it seems that Company HQ think I'm up to it.

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Hedge, good to hear man!
Reading your post does make me scratch my scalp a bit though. I'm not a native English user, so... Leave of absence? Isn't that saying the same twice? Like saying he's not here because he's not present?
Please enlighten me, who has learned his English from books but mainly fora and Internet as a whole

Sent from my H8324 using Tapatalk

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In this context, 'leave' means permission. A leave of absence means being authorised to be absent for a period of time.

Hence the related phrase 'absent without leave' (awol) for military personnel who *don't* have permission but don't turn up for duty.

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English has got to be one of the harder languages to learn as a foreign language - so many contradictory spelling rules and multiple meanings for identical words depending on context.

I don't envy anyone who didn't grow up with it.

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As someone who learnt English as a foreign language, it's not -that- bad. Sure, there're all these nyances and irregularities, but there is also tons of material written by native speaker available all over the world, meaning just spending some time to read, listen and watch, gives one a feel how to handle those irregularities in natural language.

Some other languages lack the media penetration of English, and to get the immersion, you need to go and live in the culture, English -speaking culture comes and lives with you, instead. :D

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That's true - although, unfortunately, the majority of the content is produced by the yanks so the spellings, pronunciation and even many of the words are wrong.

A lot of people who learn English as a second language speak with an American accent these days, even some in Europe.

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True, but then you also get people who, for whatever floats their boat, binge on Bertie & Wooster, Hale & Pace, Doctor Who, Heartbeat and all that ilk... :D

I have been told that I have a definite accent when speaking, but it is not American. Not something common on the Isles, either.

Really wish I could have taken the opportunity to study in UK in late 90's, but it just wasn't financially feasible for me.

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Just ordered a bunch of Biltong, original, Peri Peri and a Carolina Reaper flavour.

 

I'm not a massive red meat eater but I've been looking at jerky and biltong but only tried the mass produced supermarket stuff as opposed to smaller, batch done.

 

Here's hoping they're tasty (perfect hiking food).

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Not heard of that before, I can't eat fish (purely psychological but I have an awful aversion to it).

 

The fajita flavoured chicken jerky I grabbed one time was delicious.

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Finally booked onto an Emergency First Aid at Work course to refresh myself (especially as AEDs weren't a thing last time I was qualified).

 

It'll be a very basic course but if I get onto the SAR team I'd like to peruse becoming a team medic and I bet I'd get better deals doing it through them than striking out by myself.

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You don't need training to use an AED, that is the beauty of them. 

Well done though, committed is good! 

 

Edit cos I'm drunk and can't spell! 

Edited by shmook
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A bit of training helps save time. Plus it's fun.

 

The training models actually have 'faults' you can set up, that simulate the leads not being plugged in correctly, pads on the wrong way around, stuff like that.

 

If the budget is big enough, you can even get rescui Annie dolls with electronics inside to simulate different heartbeat patterns for the AED to analyse.

 

But yes, in general the AED is designed so that anyone can use it with no prior experience, you just follow the instructions.

 

 

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Good points on the AED from you both. It's chucked in there with the other essentials so should be a decent day to pretty much get back up to speed.

 

Then I can start looking into the more advanced stuff as I'd love to eventually do the FREC courses.

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Went out in the cold yesterday and shot frozen plastic balls at other people.  Slid on ice underneath snow so many times and broke mag lip on one of my favorite magazines, but still had a good time.  AK105 did some work compared to anything else and supposedly there is a vid of me going to town with it somewhere out there (Capital City Airsoft on facebook but I can't find/view page being a non-user, also might be intentionally misspelled or something, Michigan based).  My spur of the moment ski mask from grocery store irritated the *fruitcage* out of my face so not sure if I want to repeat that next month.

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