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Finbarqs

Inokatsu M1911A1 Standard Edition

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Hmm... will have to have a sit down with this and feel it over, torn right now. But the fact remains that the Kimber > INO 1911, so just a question of whether or not to keep it just because. I don't like it much TBH. Also, since I got the WE XDM the Colt rounded mainspring housing felt really weird in my hand... bleh. Poor me ;)

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Sallinen, your wish is my command! :)

 

ino_1911_001_mq.jpg

 

ino_1911_003_mq.jpg

 

ino_1911_015_mq.jpg

 

ino_1911_021_mq.jpg

 

 

Full album with full resolution (6Kx4K) here; https://picasaweb.google.com/117328876138007382074/InokatsuM1911StandardVersion

 

:D

 

Photos taken with Nikon D600 DSRL, Nikon 24-120 VR f4, Nikon 105 Micro VR f2.8. Exposure calibrated, custom white balance calibrated, color corrected. Although the sunlight did shift a little so they are not 100% consistent thruout.

Edited by NonEx

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Well, its quite funny. My initial reaction when I got mine was little bit the same. "Sh**t what have I spent 900bucks on?". I was then focusing on the ( for me new experience of ) play between slide and frame. But then, after a while it it grew on me. After disassembling, lubing, polishing and some adjusting of trigger so it's tight & with out play and shooting a couple of mags I'm more than happy with it. Comparing to RS And other AS guns I think it's exactly as it should be for that money. It' is not supposed to resemble a modern civilian gun like Kimber, the play between slide and frame is more than on them but on other part there are strict tolerances AND all part are steel, down to the tiniest detail. Looking at your and other photos though, it seems to be different level of ambition regarding the hand polishing of parts when looking at surface treatment. Yours looks sloopier done than on mine. Since this has been done by hand and your gun is newer( after Ino falling out with cybergun ) I guess that the guy done it hasn't been that ambitious as on earlier examples.

Edited by Obitwo

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Thanks NonEx :)

She's looking real nice and the pictures are great. Let it grow on you and keep it until some manufacturer bothers to make some proper co2 mags with no ugly bump. Or if you wish to sell it, tell me and I'll sell my other kidney in Russia and buy it off from you.

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I have to say though that my phography "skills" and equipment make this look a hell of a lot nicer than it feels IRL. Even I like it when I look at these photos, but there are too many things that are not right on it for it to be worth it...

 

Take a close look at the lines of the pistol, slide, frame etc. Inokatsu must eploy a seriously cock-eyed gun smith IMO... And the excuse that it is suposed to replicate the hurried out WW II 1911's just sounds like BS to me. I looked at a lot of pics of WW II 1911s and I can't seem to find any that look like this.

Edited by NonEx

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You must've finished it now that I saw you color corrected the pictures. Because it jet black. I had to sand paper it to make it grey. But since I removed the bbu, I can never get the gun to sound the same anymore.

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I have not done antyhing at all to the pistol, straight out of the box. The lighting might accentuate the metal and finish a bit but it isn't jet black IMO.

 

Can't speak for the nozzle and hop as I haven't taken it appart nor used it.

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What material is the nozzle made from, and is there any significant wear on the hopup rubber?

I assume it's just going to be the standard KJ Works bright red nozzle, made of some formulation of plastic that KJ rates for use with CO2.

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I assume it's just going to be the standard KJ Works bright red nozzle, made of some formulation of plastic that KJ rates for use with CO2.

Nope - not KJW internals :)

 

My own personal one is nigh on perfect. No play between slide and frame, literally. Perhaps I just got lucky...but I for one am a seriously happy camper!

 

It is not a modern 1911, so the Kimber from RA tech will likely appeal to more people...but it is a steel pistol that kicks like hell! Having skirmished this I can tell you that it will never be sold. Is this a logical or sane purchase? No. It's one that if you have to question it, it's not for you. Sad, but true

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I know newer 1911's aren't hand made by Dom anymore, but by cybergun, in which they glued the rear sight so it's solid. But yeah, mine is just like the pictures i posted earlier, but now that I have finished mine, it's much closer to that "grey" look.

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As a 1911 guy, I have to remind you that rattle and loose fit is entirely normal.

 

Remember, it's an M1911A1. A "tight" 1911 has to be custom fitted, usually. You have the slide oversized slightly, then you slowly file down the parts until it's a good, tight fit with the frame. It's highly labor-intensive and sometimes is not condusive to reliability. The military guns were made from 1911 to 1945 by the hundreds of thousands with cheap metal with generous tolerances for reliability. While many a good 1911 will have some seriously tight lockup and almost no wobble, a military 1911 is not one of those 1911s. Not saying it's bad because of that, but a loose fit is just part of the M1911, M1911A1 and its replicas.

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As a 1911 guy, I have to remind you that rattle and loose fit is entirely normal.

While it may be normal on a real one in the world of airsoft where the performance of a gas pistol partly depends on a good fit frame and slide, sloppy slide fit generally means more wasted gas, more cooldown, lower fps consistency between shots and less shots per fill of gas, not ideal if you actually want to skirmish with it but this does seem to be more of a collectors gun than anything so I guess it's not a big consideration if they are being made like that on purpose.

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While it may be normal on a real one in the world of airsoft where the performance of a gas pistol partly depends on a good fit frame and slide, sloppy slide fit generally means more wasted gas, more cooldown, lower fps consistency between shots and less shots per fill of gas, not ideal if you actually want to skirmish with it but this does seem to be more of a collectors gun than anything so I guess it's not a big consideration if they are being made like that on purpose.

 

I'm really not sure if that's true. While I will admit many poorly-fitted gas pistols are also poor in gas efficiency (WE 1911s and KJW 2011s come to mind,) I can't see why parts rattle would kill your gas efficiency, so long as the magazine gasket is seated well against the BBU. Replacement gaskets and piston O-rings have solved a lot of efficiency issues with lower-end GBBs I've owned, even ones with a lot of slop.

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I can't see why parts rattle would kill your gas efficiency, so long as the magazine gasket is seated well against the BBU.

How likely is it that it's seated well if there is significant rattle in the slide on the frame though? It probably won't 'kill' gas efficiency, and I never said it would, but if you've got a sloppy slide fit then it's likely the seal between the mag and loading nozzle isn't as good as it could be so some loss of performance is to be expected compared with the same gun with a better fit.

 

Yes you can fix things like that with various products, I make mag shims precisely for that purpose but it shouldn't really be needed straight away on such an expensive pistol imo, after some use and wear maybe.

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Slop = unnecessary friction = more force for the recoil to contend with, thereby having an effect on efficiency, albeit minor.

 

The whole 1911s are sloppy seems to be a modern Colt thing to disguise poor fit. You think a $2K 1911 will have a sloppy fit? It bloody well shouldn't do.

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Who'll send me one of these to review?

 

Since I haven't paid for it there will be no angry regret about the finish or shading the facts to make it look better than it is.

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How likely is it that it's seated well if there is significant rattle in the slide on the frame though? It probably won't 'kill' gas efficiency, and I never said it would, but if you've got a sloppy slide fit then it's likely the seal between the mag and loading nozzle isn't as good as it could be so some loss of performance is to be expected compared with the same gun with a better fit.

 

Yes you can fix things like that with various products, I make mag shims precisely for that purpose but it shouldn't really be needed straight away on such an expensive pistol imo, after some use and wear maybe.

Fair enough.

 

Slop = unnecessary friction = more force for the recoil to contend with, thereby having an effect on efficiency, albeit minor.

 

The whole 1911s are sloppy seems to be a modern Colt thing to disguise poor fit. You think a $2K 1911 will have a sloppy fit? It bloody well shouldn't do.

Correct me if I'm misunderstanding, but a slide not being tightly fitted means extra friction?

 

On the "1911s are sloppy" point: I think you should read my earlier point more carefully. Military-style M1911s and M1911A1s were historically made with generous tolerances for reliability. You can buy M1911A1-styled guns for around $400-$600 in the US. This isn't indicative of commercial 1911s in general, and nobody claimed most 1911s are loosely fitted. H

 

A mid-level 1911 breaking the thousand dollar mark generally has good fitting with its parts. The greater issue with 1911s is generally poor reliability with bullets that have wide noses due to the original being designed for 230 grain ball. This is why there's so many magazines with enhanced followers and springs, polished chambers and extended feed ramps, etc.

Edited by John_234

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Yep. A slide that is not fitted properly will not be running the way it was designed to. The contact surfaces will be touching extra surface area they would not normally contact if angles are slightly off.

 

I appreciate a lot of the wartime manufactured 1911s were put together slightly loose but you can't really say they all were. It depended on the manufacturer. Then the mismatching of parts e.t.c. There are WWI and WWII 1911s that are fitted better than modern 1911s and the other way around.

 

Whilst some were loose from the get go, many were shot loose over the years.

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Yep. A slide that is not fitted properly will not be running the way it was designed to. The contact surfaces will be touching extra surface area they would not normally contact if angles are slightly off.

 

I appreciate a lot of the wartime manufactured 1911s were put together slightly loose but you can't really say they all were. It depended on the manufacturer. Then the mismatching of parts e.t.c. There are WWI and WWII 1911s that are fitted better than modern 1911s and the other way around.

 

Whilst some were loose from the get go, many were shot loose over the years.

Right, but there's a difference between an improperly made or fitted slide with bad angles and a gun that is intentionally loose in tolerances.

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On mine the slide to frame fit is slightly bent off, like the slide sides are arched upwards on the outer edges so it's kind of a scoop down towards the frame. That is not a loose fit, that is a poor fit...

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On mine the slide to frame fit is slightly bent off, like the slide sides are arched upwards on the outer edges so it's kind of a scoop down towards the frame. That is not a loose fit, that is a poor fit...

D: That is pretty bad.

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a lot of people will say "The original WWII Colt has loose fittings also!" Well, AFTER HOLDING a REAL WWII COLT 1911A1, yes it's loose. But not inokatsu loose! If a solid pistol is 100%, colt is like 85%-90% solid, with 10% play. Inokatsu is more like 50%-60% play. Even the safety selector is loose as hell. The colt is 100% solid on the safety selector, Inokatsu is like 40-50%.

 

The fitting is probably 50% of original colt.

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