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bjorn

Best airsoft silencer?

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Got a pile of suppressors..Bigger the better. Running a 40x250 in my P*. "Best" internals have been machined hard rubber discs with 8mm opening combined with typical asg packaging foam cut to discs with variable id of 25-30+. Rubber discs are held tightly by friction and are installed using a stick which is close to the ID. The stick has measures for each disc position to avoid crushing the foam.

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I think I'll test increasing "expansion chamber" surface area next. Ie. making foam discs somewhat like this

 

625x465_769937_692116_1429685312.jpg

 

Btw making the discs is extremely easy. Just twist the open silencer tube against the material few times. Rest is easy to add with a suitable knife or for holes other sharpish tubes.

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Bit of a necro-post, but I think this thread is worth keeping alive. I am beginning to build a can for my newly acquired Action Army AAC01 (KJW M700P with some minor external upgrades) and I thought I would post about it throughout the build process. To begin the base I am using for the can is a random off brand can that I picked up from a friend for $5.00. It is approximately 7 inches long and has an inner diameter of 1.5 inches. The endcaps were simply press fit into the tube, which I am not a huge fan of, but they are extremely tight when assembled, so I am not to concerned. Currently both ends have threaded 14mm holes which will be changing, as I will be turning a new front endcap for it with a 8 or 9mm hole for the BB to exit the can. I have not decided which size I will go with, but I will decide once I turn the endcap. As of right now my plan is to have foam and some 3D printed components inside of the can. I will post some sketches as soon as I have them down on paper. I am hoping to build a pretty nice can, and  think the fact that it is being installed on to a gas BASR will really show off the difference that having a properly built can has on quieting down the shot signature of the rifle. 

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Sure thing to keep this alive !

Here is a design of me, what do you think ?

 

Airsoft wise, it should be fine. But from a real steel or even airgun perspective, having the baffles angled away from the muzzle can cause them to collapse outwards, enlarging the baffle hole or causing it to tear which renders it less effective. Baffles inclined towards the muzzle are inherently stronger plus give a slight boost in fps due to venturi effect.

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I've taken to replacing the stock low-density foam included with airsoft suppressors with felt washers for drum set cymbal stands, like these:

 

http://www.guitarcenter.com/Yamaha/Cymbal-Stand-Felt-Washer-2pk-1274115032850.gc

 

They are quite effective at suppressing muzzle report.

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Airsoft wise, it should be fine. But from a real steel or even airgun perspective, having the baffles angled away from the muzzle can cause them to collapse outwards, enlarging the baffle hole or causing it to tear which renders it less effective. Baffles inclined towards the muzzle are inherently stronger plus give a slight boost in fps due to venturi effect.

Mmm.. i should lathe them out of pvc or another rigid material dont think they wil collapse in an air gun  :no:

 

I've taken to replacing the stock low-density foam included with airsoft suppressors with felt washers for drum set cymbal stands, like these:

 

http://www.guitarcenter.com/Yamaha/Cymbal-Stand-Felt-Washer-2pk-1274115032850.gc

 

They are quite effective at suppressing muzzle report.

So is felt better for sound absorption ? 

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Id b interested to actually see the difference in decibles between suppressed/unsuppressed. ......

Given how cheap and easy to get Sound Pressure Level / Decibel meters are these days it isnt hard for folks to pick one up.

 

For example (and not a particular recommendation)

 

http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/mini-sound-level-meter-n33gj

 

http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/digital-sound-level-meter-n05cc

 

http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/di-log-digital-sound-level-meter-a95zz

 

 

I think that they are just about as essential for someone making their own silencers/suppressors/moderators as a chrono is for someone working on rifles. OK so they wont be calibrated or hugely accurate but they will give you some measurements to properly compare the performance of your designs against each other with. They will also give people some numbers to quote in posts. So much airsoft "science" is just people saying something is better or worse, louder or quieter, more or less accurate with no measured figures to back things up.

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Try to keep it on the DL as for most countries even a mock suppressors with foam in it it becomes an illegal item.

 

Not sure on your laws but I hope everyone in the US does not say they made a suppressor.

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In the UK there are no legal issues. It is my understanding that, at least in some states in America, it is possible to legally posses a silencer/moderator/suppressor with the appropriate paperwork. However for the sake of argument any comments I make are aimed at readers in countries where it is not illegal to make / modify / posses devices to reduce the report from an airsoft rifle or pistol when fired.

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From my experience, I'd say so. I'm not sure why.

What you are trying to do is reduce the velocity of the air leaving the barrel. You can do this by getting it to pass through material to absorb energy from the air / slow it down. If you use a closed cell foam the air just bounces off. Open cell foam allows the air to pass through the pores in the foam. Slowing it down and absorbing the energy. Acoustic felt is designed specifically to absorb sound. I suspect that the structure of the felt and way it responds to the air as it is forced through the fibres does a better job of dissipating the energy from the pulse of air than an open cell foam does. This is likely to be down to the differences in structure: tiny fibres pressed together as opposed to a plastic full of open inter connected bubbles. I think the size of the holes between the fibres and the way the air flows between them has something to do with it. My guess is most commercial airsoft silencers don't use materials specifically designed as acoustic absorbing materials. They just use some off the shelf open cell foam. I have looked in to acoustic felt and havent had much luck sourcing the material at a reasonable cost

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Airsoft wise, it should be fine. But from a real steel or even airgun perspective, having the baffles angled away from the muzzle can cause them to collapse outwards, enlarging the baffle hole or causing it to tear which renders it less effective. Baffles inclined towards the muzzle are inherently stronger plus give a slight boost in fps due to venturi effect.

Right it should be like this , my mistake

o79KfEK.png

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With the 3D printing possibilities I am thinking that soon enough we will have a prototype printed. E.g. an insert for popular aluminium "available on the market suppressor" kind of thing. 

If I knew it would work better then off the shelf simple design suppressors I would be willing to pay about 40-50 eur for a good insert, or 60-80 eur for a whole suppressor in the EU. 

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bMigURm.jpg

 

My Crusader TR45S Silencer comes with some decent enough open-cell foam. I cut some plastic sheets and rearrange them foam-sheet-foam-sheet back into the can.

 

The host weapon is an APS-2 which I added a stick poking out the front the piston, even with a not-so-long 375mm and 6.08 "wide" bore inner barrel, the sound of shooting became a very dampened "puff" even if it's heard from shooter's side.

 

I asked a friend shooting at something next to where I was standing, from just few meters away, I could only hear BB cutting through air and hitting the target.

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I also think we can maintain these principles of RS suppressors, since in a matter of fact , the functioning-princype  is identical, not ?

An obvious detail; an expansion chamber in the beginning of the suppressor appears to be a common design !

suppressor-x-ray_FINAL.jpg

 

P1310407.jpg

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3d printed "cups" as baffles would be doable I'm sure, and if well designed they could be printed to fit almost any diameter of silencer housing.

 

Although to be honest I'm surprised nobody has printed a complete Osprey type with inclusive baffles yet!

 

Jim.

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I believe the initial chamber is more of a stand off space so the hot plasma doesn't erode the first baffle so much. If you look at small caliber suppressors like for .22LRs, the space is much smaller as the muzzle blast is equally smaller. For airsoft there's no need for this extra chamber, but will none the less help as an expansion chamber.

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Most get cans for larger caliber guns for multi use but the larger the can on a small caliber gun will be quieter. So how much space do you need to effectively quiet a gas gun as much as you can?

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Depends on the gun I suppose. Some have short barrels and a lot of gas coming out so it needs a lot of space to contain the gas. But for practical purposes you only need to cut out the sharp pop (KWA mp9 and Tanaka m500 comes to mind) and its sound signature won't carry far which can be achieved with even small cans with the right filler/baffles.

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