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Geri

Silverback DTA SRS A1

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Anyone else as exited as me for this rifle? 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8GgQ8oWihQ

 

 

 

Hi All,

Here is a 3D assembly video introducing our coming Desert Tech licensed rifle, the Stealth Recon Scout A1 (SRS A1) Spring Bolt Airsoft Rifle.

We will use only high grade material for this Airsoft rifle:

- In order to respect most of the awesome features of the original SRS, we had to develop a new patented spring bolt system, push forward compression, spring guide less design. The bolt assembly is made of a steel cylinder, cylinder head and bolt handle. Piston assembly is made of 6061 aluminium. It will feature a steel piston sear and the system will allow bolt quick change, no tools needed. Muzzle energy will range between 0.8 Joules to 1.8 Joules depending on your country regulations.

-Receiver and outer barrel: CNC 6061 T6 aluminium.

-Railed handguard: CNC 6061 T5 aluminium and reinforced nylon additional rails.

-Rifle stock will be made of reinforced nylon, black, Flat Dark Earth and OD colors will be available

-Steel magazine, with reinforced nylon internal, 30 rounds capacity.

-Monopod, included with all Silverback Airsoft SRS, accurate replica of the Desert Tech LLC patented monopod, CNC 6061 aluminium.

-Two way aluminium hop up unit, directly attached to the quick change barrel assembly, allowing barrel switch in seconds while keeping your hop up setting. Barrel attachment is exactly like the original.

-CNC aluminium trigger, with position and preload adjustment .

-No injection molding metal parts, no zinc alloy, all screws are in 10.9 steel.

The Silverback Airsoft SRS will be available in three versions:

-SRS A1 Covert, with a short handguard , 16 inches outer barrel and a checkered thread protection (420 mm inner barrel) with an overall length of 675 mm, weight 2870 grams.

-SRS A1 .308, (the one displayed in this video) with long handguard , 22 inches fluted outer barrel and the .308 flash hider (578 mm inner barrel) for an overall length of 850 mm, weight 3130 grams.

SRS A1 .338 LM, with long handguard , 26 inches fluted outer barrel and the .338LM flash hider (680 mm inner barrel) with an overall length of 980 mm, weight 3250 grams.

Pictures and video of the prototype will be posted next month, we expect a release date during fall 2015.

 

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Is that not like a "single stroke pneumatic" air rifle system? Pushing forward compresses the air then the trigger just opens a valve?

 

Or have I got the wrong end of the stick?

 

Jim.

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Well they say it has piston and sears, so I can only imagine it'll essentially work like a VSR without the spring guide and spring guide stopper. 

 

Pull back with no resistance to hook the piston on the sear, then push the bolt handle forwards against the spring to lock it in place.

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Mmm, yeah sounds more reasonable.

 

The CAD video looked interesting but the hop looked like it had 2 grub screws on the top for hop left/right adjust which doesnt bode well.

 

Jim.

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Double the hop screws, double the chances for it being due to shoddy tolerances.

 

 

 

Not that I'm casting aspersions on the thing. I'll wait till I've seen it in the flesh first. 

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I dont think i could load it if it would be a usual spring system, but i have comcerns abaut the trigger mech and that connection rod... And i dont think those two screws are the nub... They are just wrongly placed for that, at least i hope so :D i rather would be happy with a vsr rubber and a simple H nub.

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Ps.: if its loaded, the body of the piston is exposed to dirt and weather... It seems like a bad idea, but we will see how well its sealed.

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If you watch the video you can see how the piston works. For them to say it is "spring guideless" is a smidge disingenuous as the spring guide is effectively built on to the piston head. The piston itself is like a piston head screwed on to an extended spring guide. The piston sear engaging surface is on the disk of the spring guide. The bolt handle/cocking lever mount is on a shroud surrounding the air nozzle. The spring is inside the cylinder and bears against a rear bulkhead with a hole in the centre through which the piston / spring guide rod passes. The spring itself is fitted over the rod which connects the piston head and rear flange / sear disk. To cock it you pull the bolt/piston assembly backwards to engage the piston rear flange with the sear. You then force the piston cylinder forward against the spring to load a BB with the air nozzle. I assume that there is some kind of forward sear which latches the bolt forward holding the air nozzle in place and stopping the cylinder springing back. It may be that rotating the bolt will do this by locking the breach closed so to speak. If this is the case I hope there is something to prevent accidentally knocking the cocking lever back up which could fling the cylinder back with some force.

 

It is certainly an interesting design and they will have to use good quality materials as they mention to make some of those parts robust enough. WIll be interesting to see what one looks like in real life.

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Mmm, yeah sounds more reasonable.

The CAD video looked interesting but the hop looked like it had 2 grub screws on the top for hop left/right adjust which doesnt bode well.

Jim.

Double the hop screws, double the chances for it being ###### due to shoddy tolerances.

 

 

 

Not that I'm casting aspersions on the thing. I'll wait till I've seen it in the flesh first.

 

Late to the party, but I've had firsthand experience of a twin screw hop, the PDI unit for the maruzen/warrior L96.

 

The only thing stopping me from ripping it out and hoying it as far into the distance I could was the fact I paid a small fortune for it.

 

I wouldn't invest in another...

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From their FB page:

 

"A video of the prototype is available on Youtube, it will show you the bolt manipulation and shooting, we used a SRS A1 22" configuration, 6.05 mm barrel (578mm length) , 0.20g bbs with a bolt delivering a muzzle energy of 1.7 Joule. A version below one Joule will be available.

Then you will see a quick conversion demonstration from a Covert 16" configuration to a A1 26". It will also show you how the airsoft model is similar to the real one. 

We expect a release this fall, Hong Kong msrp will be around 500 USD. All interchangeable parts will be available: barrels, handguards, flahhiders, bolts, rails...

Stay tuned for updates, and thanks for watching!"

 

They used 020, they claim in the comments that it uses AEG spring. 500$ price tag, very interesting if the internals are as good as they claim, all steel sears and trigger.

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thanks for the info, I am not owned by fb so I did not know that.

Must say it looks very solid in built for a prototype.

500$ is not bad considering the R&D that has been done.

Wonder if it would be a PITA for left handed shooters?

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When the PDI Maruzen hop units work (and with a lot of effort they can), they are great. But they are so finicky to get right! Also if the grub screws come loose they will mess up the nozzle. VSR type hops are sooooo much easier to set.

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Also on airsoftglobal.

 

It seems they really built it with the two screw hopup unit, thats very dissapointing, pure lazyness. Whatever, it will hang on my wall just the same as it would with a simple H nub. :D

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