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FUmiYAsu

Battery Care....

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There don't seem to be a thread about this so I thought I will start one.....

So what do I need to do to take care of a Ni-MH batt and Cd ones??

 

I've heard tht MH batts don't need discharging....is tht true?..and do we actually need to charge them longer the first time?

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All batteries used in Airsoft need a longer first charge than subsequent charges. This is done to 'condition' the battery. Many batteries come with instructions regarding the required length of their first charge.

 

Ni-Cad batteries can benefit from regular discharging, although it is not absolutely essential unless you use exactly the same amount of power from them after each charge (for example - if you always use 70% of the juice available, then discharging is beneficial).

 

Ni-MH batteries do not require discharging after each use, but doing so won't hurt them.

 

Airsoft batteries are usually made up from 1.2 volt cells. The standard battery size is 8.4v (7 cells), but 9.6v (8 celled) batteries are also common. They are available in small and large sizes. The small sizes fit easily in to most guns, but large sizes hold a lot more power (typically up to about 3 times more).

 

Increasing the voltage supplied to your AEG will result in an increased Rate Of Fire (shots per second), but can also increase stress to the gearbox. If there is a serious jam in the AEG, increased voltage will also make your fuse blow quicker (unless you don't have a fuse, in which case your electronics will fry faster). Increasing the charge of the battery (measured in mAh (Mili-Amp Hours)) will increase both the amount of power (number of shots) available, and the available torque. The torque increase can result in a higher Rate Of Fire for upgraded guns (stronger spring). Stock guns only experience a very slight increase.

 

Ni-Cad batteries tend to have a little more 'punch' than Ni-MH, but discharge on a curve. This means that as the power gets used, it outputs that power at a lower rate until there is none left. The Ni-MH curve is a lot flatter. There is a very slight dip in available power near the start of their use, but then the output remains constant until the very end. It then dies fairly quickly.

 

Ni-MH batteries can also hold more power than a similar sized Ni-Cad battery.

 

It is best not to leave either type of battery charged during long periods of storage. Ni-Cad batteries will discharge automatically over time, which can result in battery damage if done repeatedly. Ni-MH batteries do the same, but they hold their charge for a much longer period of time (months as opposed to a week or so). It is also important that batteries are not stored TOTALLY dead. This rarely happens and you don't need to take any precautons to avoid this.

 

Neither type of battery should EVER be shorted out. This will generate a lot of heat very quickly and literally 'cook' your power pack.

 

Charging of batteries can be worked out using the following equation...

 

 

---------------------------------------------------------

Total Battery Capacity (mAh) divided by Charge Rate (mA) multiplied by 1.4

 

For example, if you have a 3,000mAh battery, and a 300mA charger, it would look something like this...

 

> (3000 / 300) * 1.4

= 10 * 1.4

= 14 hours

 

(as mentioned earlier - a battery's first charge should be longer)

---------------------------------------------------------

 

 

I hope all that is useful.

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i've read posts somewhere else on taping the hell outta your battery either to keep the bright colours out of the way or just 'water proof' it? it looks pretty water proof to me for my batteries anyway... but does it still 'leak' into the battery pack if it literally chucks it down? R22 you seem to be all clued up on this, any advise?

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There's no real need to water-proof your batteries. Most packs already have a water-proof layer of shrink-wrap anyway.

 

Batteries will work fine even under water, but if they do get soaked inside, don't store them wet. Doing this could lead the contacts to start rusting.

 

Taping it up might help, but it can still leak - it depends how well you tape it up ;)

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walks off to B&Qit with a fat roll duck tape

 

*tapes himself up*

######, anyone got a pair of skissors? :lol:

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Increasing the voltage supplied to your AEG will result in an increased Rate Of Fire (shots per second), but can also increase stress to the gearbox.

So on that assumption using a 7.2 volt battery is best for your gun then? Would a 7.2 cause a problem on a CA m4 (steel gears)?

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so i just got a new gun and battery my first nicad but i may be on a bad path i charged it for like 4 hours not the 5 arnies bat calc recomended then went out and shot off my first mag... should i discharge it or charge it now? i mean im suposed to charge the heck out of it the first time? but i didnt do that ohh no!

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so i just got a new gun and battery my first nicad but i may be on a bad path i charged it for like 4 hours not the 5 arnies bat calc recomended then went out and shot off my first mag... should i discharge it or charge it now?  i mean im suposed to charge the heck out of it the first time? but i didnt do that ohh no!

 

 

it won't hurt your battery. dont over stress yourself.

 

I still think getting a microprocessor controlled charger is the best to keep your battery in tip top condition.

 

i fried my original marui charger . didn't read the label properly and plug the 110v charger into 240v wall socket outlet.

 

now i am using a modified adapter to do my charging.

 

i just charge and shut it off when i wake up.

don't really know how much is the charge

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so i just got a new gun and battery my first nicad but i may be on a bad path i charged it for like 4 hours not the 5 arnies bat calc recomended then went out and shot off my first mag... should i discharge it or charge it now?  i mean im suposed to charge the heck out of it the first time? but i didnt do that ohh no!

Memory effect is a cumulative thing rather than the result of a one-off charge.

 

Look at the output of your charger and the capacity of your battery, then charge it according to the calculation that R22 posted at the top of this page. Continue to do this and your battery shouldn't develop any memory effect.

 

If, for example, you had a 600mAh battery and your charger was rated to 100mA then here's the right way to do it:

 

600 x 1.4 = 840

840 / 100 = 8.4

Charging time: 8.4 hours.

 

If you were to charge that battery (with that charger) for 4 hours then it'd only be half-charged. If you did that a lot you'd find that, even if you charged it for 8 hours, it'd still only last as long as it did when you charged it for 4 hours.

That's how memory-effect works. ;)

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yeh should do as it is that is only storage cacity of the bat (i.e the amount of jucie that in the bat) so that will only affect the length of time the bat can be used (and those a big battery sizes i can tell you:D)

if wrong please correct me sid !!

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Correct. :)

 

mAh is capacity, voltage is flow. If you use a battery with a high voltage, your AEG internals will vapourise quicker than you can say "Whoops". More capacity just gives you more running time.

 

You can stick an 8.4volt 5,000mAh pack in a stock AEG and it will work just fine.

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I just got a TLP 4000C pulse charger, and a coupla 8.4v 600mAh batts. The charger has variable mAh and goes up to 2400mAh!

 

I've been charging the batteries at 600mAh, because I don't know much about battery care and don't want to fry the things, but I don't even know if it makes a difference....

 

What's the highest mAh you should charge batteries at? Can it actually damage them to charge at 2400mAh, or will it just go quicker?!

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You don't charge batteries at "mAh". Charge Rate is measured in "mA". "mAh" is the total full capacity of the battery (see previous posts).

 

If your charger is definitely selectable between 600mAh and 2400mAh, these markings are likely to be settings that should match the Size of the battery you are using.

 

(e.g. Select 600mAh and it will fully charge a 600mAh battery for you, knowing when to stop, etc...).

 

If on the other hand it is marked as "mA", then select a value lower than 600mA (between 150 and 300mA is ideal) and charge according to the foruma on my earlier thread.

 

 

Hope that helps.

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Yes, but i know from previous experience that a 2600mAh delivers a hell of a lot more punch than, for instance, a 1300mAh on the motor in my remote control buggy. It shredded the gears on that quite nicely and when you get down to the nuts and bolts of it, theres not much difference between the two. (8.4v DC motor, battery and carbon fiber/steel gears)

I do realise that its not the amps that are the main effect on the ferocity of the motor, its the voltage. But naturally i ask the experts before spending £50 on a battery just for the privilege of having it turn my brand new AEG into an attractive paperweight.

 

Ignorance invites disaster......hows your MAC11 Doc?

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Yes, but i know from previous experience that a 2600mAh delivers a hell of a lot more punch than, for instance, a 1300mAh on the motor in my remote control buggy....

 

That's right. Higher capacity (mAh) does not make motors run faster than their normal speed, but gives them more juice for the motor to draw on when a greater resistance is present. The end result is that a faster rotation of the motor and system when under heavy load.

 

 

For example...

 

An 8.4v 2600mAh battery will give you a noticably higher rate of fire in a heavily upgraded gun than an 8.4v 1300mAh pack, even though the voltages are the same. There will be almost no difference between these two packs in a stock AEG. Try it out. Alternatively, try putting an 8.4v 600mAh small type battery in a heavily upgraded AEG and listen to it struggle.

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