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Soldering Techniques for Airsoft

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Well, I converted my Tamiya batteries to Deans and it went smoothly. Another way to protect from shorts is cutting ONE cable from the Tamiyas each time, leaving the other inside the plastic plug.

 

Also, if you are looking for which one of the Tamiyas is the positive -my batteries had transparent cable on both, not colored ones- be aware that some pages, as the Wiki can tell you confusing information like this: "the usual wiring has the positive (red) wire running to the terminal with a square profile, and the negative (black) wire running to the half-circle, half-square terminal."

That simply wasn't true for my batteries. The squared profile was the negative. The charging cables made me suspect, as they were colored and red was going to the "negative" pole, so I used a polymeter to check polarity.

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I have to ask about soldering wires. Is it necessary to use that flux thingy. Will it harm the electricity current if a wire goes to motor from battery and then u take off of some part of the wire the protective layer to get to the wires inside and solder there a wire wich goes to other place. Note: im doing a MOSFET and putting deans on my guns/batteries.

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Flux isn't necessary. I use a flux pen just because a touch extra flux makes the solder flow easier. Most solder contains flux in it.

 

If you're talking about having a wire that goes from the battery to the motor, and in the middle you have a wire that goes off to the trigger switch, then that's no problem. It'll work out just fine.

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is it not a bit annoying having the motor soldered to the wires? wont this make it hard to disassemble the gun. im thinking with something like an M4 that requires you to remove the motor (to remove the pistol grip) to take the gearbox out.

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I have to ask about soldering wires. Is it necessary to use that flux thingy. Will it harm the electricity current if a wire goes to motor from battery and then u take off of some part of the wire the protective layer to get to the wires inside and solder there a wire wich goes to other place. Note: im doing a MOSFET and putting deans on my guns/batteries.

 

In my opinion, flux is extremely important as it prevents the formation of metal oxides at high temperatures. It also reduces surface tension of the solder in its molten state, giving you a smoother solder as had been said. Good quality solder alloys should come with flux in them. Bear in mind if you are using a flux pen, some types of flux (especially if they are rosin mixed with an active agent such as acid) are corrosive, so make sure you remove any residue left by it.

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Yep. It's a bit annoying. Thats why I try to build it once and just have it work. Doesn't always work that way though. It is a better connection, won't come undone on it's own, and is going to have less resistance.

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With airsoft and tamiya's Red=Round hole / plug.

Not 100% correct.

 

There are 2 types of Tamiya connectors, big and small.

 

They are wired differently.

 

Easiest way to remember is "red is round, but not on big"

 

The +(red) connector on the large connectors is square

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Not 100% correct.

 

There are 2 types of Tamiya connectors, big and small.

 

They are wired differently.

 

Easiest way to remember is "red is round, but not on big"

 

The +(red) connector on the large connectors is square

 

 

You're 100% right. I don't know what I was thinking when I posted that.

 

 

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Great thread guys, been soldering in anger for years, never used flux until recently and works a dream!

 

No more melting deans connectors and massive solder joints!!!

 

Cheers

 

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there a few variables you may need to consider

 

what type of solder you are using (standard lead/tin, Green or acid flex). the reason being that you need to different temperatures for every type. If you can afford it i would recommend a temperature controlled iron.

 

where you are working, sometimes a Gas powered soldering iron may be best, because you can use it in the field as well. Once you get used to the temp settings, they are a lot more versatile than a mains powered iron.

CPC are doing some good offers on both mains and gas powered irons at the moment.

 

basic iron care is an essential for anyone who uses them on a regular basis,

always pre tin your iron

make sure your iron is cleaned after every use, as the corrosive properties of flux can "pit" the iron tip.

if you iron tip does get damaged through pitting or over temp try and clean down the surface with a fine file or some emery paper

 

all of the above will also prolong the life of your tools

 

hope this is helpful without sounding too condescending.

 

have fun

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This is probably an appropriate place to ask this...are airsoft and non-airsoft mini Tamiyas wired differently? Because on component-shop.co.uk you can buy mini Tamiyas in 'airsoft' and 'radio control' varieties, and I couldn't work out what the difference was...polarity? This only applies for minis too, not the large ones.

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On another note, have you ever thought about reading people bed-time stories for a living?

 

good one. :D I know, it was real monotone. I don't know why because that is so not my usual tone. I think it was just difficult talking while trying not to put a hot iron into my finger while working a digital camera that was too bulky to get the job done that had me distracted.

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